GENERAL MEDICINE

  • General Medicine is a base speciality and it’s assistance is sought by all super specialities. The consultant faculty comprises of highly trained physicians.
  • Their clinical skills are supported by excellent laboratory and investigatory facilities so that many patients from other parts of India.

A. Viral Fever

Most people have a body temperature of about 98.6°F (37°C). Anything a degree above this is considered a fever. Fevers are often a sign that your body is fighting off some type of bacterial or viral infection. A viral fever is any fever that’s caused by an underlying viral illness.

A variety of viral infections can affect humans, from the common cold to the flu. A low-grade fever is a symptom of many viral infections. But some viral infections, such as dengue fever, can cause a higher fever.

Symptoms of a viral fever : Viral fevers can range in temperature from 99°F to over 103°F (39°C), depending on the underlying virus.
If you have a viral fever, you might have some of these general symptoms:

  • chills
  • sweating
  • dehydration
  • headache
  • muscle aches and pains
  • a feeling of weakness
  • loss of appetite

These symptoms usually only last for a few days at most.

In many cases, a viral fever isn’t anything to worry about. But if you have a fever that reaches 103°F (39°C) or higher, it’s best to call a doctor. You should also call a doctor if you have a baby with a rectal temperature of 100.4°F (38°C) or higherIf you have a fever, keep an eye out for the following symptoms, which all indicate a need for medical treatment:

  • severe headache
  • difficulty breathing
  • chest pain
  • abdominal pains
  • frequent vomiting
  • a rash, especially if it quickly gets worse
  • a stiff neck, especially if you feel pain when bending it forward
  • confusion
  • convulsions or seizures

Causes a viral fever

A viral fever is caused by infection with a virus. Viruses are very small infectious agents. They infect and multiply within the cells of your body. A fever is your body’s way of fighting off a virus. Many viruses are sensitive to shifts in temperature, so a sudden increase in your body temperature makes you less hospitable to viruses. There are many ways that you can become infected with a virus, including:

  • Inhalation : If someone with a viral infection sneezes or coughs near you, you can breathe in droplets containing the virus. Examples of viral infections from inhalation include the flu or common cold.
  • Ingestion : Food and drinks can be contaminated with viruses. If you eat them, you can develop an infection. Examples of viral infections from ingestion include norovirus and enteroviruses.
  • Bites : Insects and other animals can carry viruses. If they bite you, you can develop an infection. Examples of viral infections that result from bites include dengue fever and rabies.
  • Bodily fluids : Exchanging bodily fluids with someone who has a viral infection can transfer the illness. Examples of this type of viral infection include hepatitis B and HIV.

A viral fever refers to any fever that results from a viral infection, such as the flu or dengue fever. While most viral fevers resolve on their own within a day or two, some are more severe and require medical treatment. If your temperature starts reading 103°F (39°C) or higher, it’s time to call a doctor. Otherwise, try to get as much rest as possible and stay hydrated.

B. Diabeties

Diabetes is a condition that impairs the body’s ability to process blood glucose, otherwise known as blood sugar.Without ongoing, careful management, diabetes can lead to a buildup of sugars in the blood, which can increase the risk of dangerous complications, including stroke and heart disease.Different kinds of diabetes can occur, and managing the condition depends on the type. Not all forms of diabetes stem from a person being overweight or leading an inactive lifestyle. In fact, some are present from childhood.

Type

Type 1 diabetes : Also known as juvenile diabetes, this type occurs when the body fails to produce insulin. People with type I diabetes are insulin-dependent, which means they must take artificial insulin daily to stay alive.

Type 2 diabetes : Affects the way the body uses insulin. While the body still makes insulin, unlike in type I, the cells in the body do not respond to it as effectively as they once did. This is the most common type of diabetes, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and it has strong links with obesity.

Gestational diabetes : This type occurs in women during pregnancy when the body can become less sensitive to insulin. Gestational diabetes does not occur in all women and usually resolves after giving birth.

Less common types of diabetes include monogenic diabetes and cystic fibrosis-related diabetes.

Prediabetes

Doctors refer to some people as having prediabetes or borderline diabetes when blood sugar is usually in the range of 100 to 125 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Normal blood sugar levels sit between 70 and 99 mg/dL, whereas a person with diabetes will have a fasting blood sugar higher than 126 mg/dL.The prediabetes level means that blood glucose is higher than usual but not so high as to constitute diabetes.People with prediabetes are, however, at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, although they do not usually experience the symptoms of full diabetes.The risk factors for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are similar. They include:

  • being overweight
  • a family history of diabetes
  • having a high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level lower than 40 mg/dL or 50 mg/dL
  • a history of high blood pressure
  • having gestational diabetes or giving birth to a child with a birth weight of more than 9 pounds
  • a history of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
  • being more than 45 years of age
  • having a sedentary lifestyle

If a doctor identifies that a person has prediabetes, they will recommend that the individual makes healthful changes that can ideally stop the progression to type 2 diabetes. Losing weight and having a more healthful diet can often help prevent the disease.

Hypertension ( High Blood Pressure)

High blood pressure is a common condition in which the long-term force of the blood against your artery walls is high enough that it may eventually cause health problems, such as heart disease.

Blood pressure is determined both by the amount of blood your heart pumps and the amount of resistance to blood flow in your arteries. The more blood your heart pumps and the narrower your arteries, the higher your blood pressure.

You can have high blood pressure (hypertension) for years without any symptoms. Even without symptoms, damage to blood vessels and your heart continues and can be detected. Uncontrolled high blood pressure increases your risk of serious health problems, including heart attack and stroke.

High blood pressure generally develops over many years, and it affects nearly everyone eventually. Fortunately, high blood pressure can be easily detected. And once you know you have high blood pressure, you can work with your doctor to control it.

Symptoms

Most people with high blood pressure have no signs or symptoms, even if blood pressure readings reach dangerously high levels.

A few people with high blood pressure may have headaches, shortness of breath or nosebleeds, but these signs and symptoms aren’t specific and usually don’t occur until high blood pressure has reached a severe or life-threatening stage.

Service Hours

Contact : 8104242551
Location : Kalsekar hospital building, Ground Floor, Kausa , Mumbra

Dr. Khalid Ansari

M.D(Medicine/DNB) General Physician
Timings :
Mon to Sat – 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM (Private)
Wed & Fri 9:00 AM to 10:00 AM (Chairity)

Dr. Farooq Sultan

MBBS, FCPS, INT_MED, General Physician
Timings :
Mon to Sat – 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Tue to Thu – 9:00 AM to 10:00 AM (Private)

Dr. Raju Kanak

M.B.B.S & D.N.B General Physician
Timings :
Mon to Sat – 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM ( Private)
Fri – 9:00 AM to 10:00 AM (Chairity)

Dr. Pramod chauhan

M.B.B.S & M.D General Physician
Timings :
Mon to Sat 8:00 PM to 10:00 PM (Private)

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